Tag Archives: writing

Author Interview #10 – K Kibbee

If there’s one author on Twitter that’s stood out above others, it’s K (Kristine) Kibbee. When I first got involved with the #amwriting crowd, her work in progress bits caught my eye, and I knew I wanted to interview her for my blog.

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After reading one of her books, I finally was able to reach out to her! Enjoy.

Q. To start out, tell us a little bit about what project you’re currently working on. What part of the writing process are you in?

  • Goodness gracious, it’d be easier to tell you what I’m NOT working on! I’m presently launching book three in the Forests of the Fae series (Lang’s Labyrinth), prepping book #2 in my Theodore and the Enchanted Bookstore series (The Tale of Robin Hound) AND working on a new, hush-hush project that I hope will be the biggest yet!

 


Q. I’ve only read one of your books, Devlin’s Door: Forests of the Fae, and I love the use of the Pacific Northwest mixed with fairies. What was your biggest influences for your Forests of the Fae series?

  • Interesting you should ask, m’dear! I was inspired to write FotF after reading about an old, abandoned ghost town across the bay from Astoria. The city, named Frankfort, was left for dead back in the 60’s and has become an inhabitable, unreachable place overtaken by the wilds of the Northwest. It provided fodder a’plenty for this ole’ writer brain to get going, and my childhood fascination with Faeries took over from there! I’ve long been a fan of all things Faerie (think Brian Froud, Jim Henson, etc.), particularly the darker ilk. 😉

 

Q. If you could have dinner with any of your antagonists which one would it be?

  • Wow, that’s an excellent question! I think I’d love to have dinner with Aunt Claudia…just to see the glower on her face.

 

Who inspired you the most in your writing life?

  • I suppose that my Mom was my biggest inspiration. Ironically, she’s also been my loudest critic . . . but it’s ultimately made me a better writer.

 

Q. You’re extremely active online, and participate in numerous hashtag games. What advice would you give to people who are trying to build their online presence?

  • Another well-timed question on your part! I actually just participated in a podcast/Skype-style interview that is geared towards up-and-coming writers who are seeking to gain a foothold in the literary community. As my portion of the presentation, I offered a 30-minute “Tweetorial,” which will be available online next month! I don’t have a link at present, but Sage Adderly, with “Sage’s Blog Tours,” is the driving force and should be posting it in the coming weeks.

 

Q. What writer do you look up to? Do you find yourself emulating their writing style?

  • If I were to pick a recognizable face to look up to, it would probably be J.K. Rowling’s. I’m sure this is an answer often given by indie authors, but I suspect my reasoning is different. I fancy Rowling for her activism and for what she’s done to improve the writing world (and the world at large!) with her sizable royalty checks. I do, also, admittedly, admire her dedication to research and world building… although I don’t find myself emulating her work.

 

Q. I noticed you went to college at Washington State University. Were there any professors who influenced your writing or inspired you on your journey?

  • Honestly, my memory has the consistency of Swiss cheese. Unless you’d reminded me that I went to WSU, I’d have plum forgotten! So…that’s a hard no. I can’t even remember my professors’ names!

 

Q. When writing Devlin’s Door, was the main character, Anne, inspired by anyone in your life?

  • Anne was more inspired by everyone than anyone. I tried to make Anne your ordinary, everyday girl. She has no magical powers . . . no royal ancestry . . . she’s just a girl with pluck, cleverness, and an enduring spirit.

 

Q. What was the first writing project you worked on and what did you learn from it?

  • Again with the Swiss cheese memory! I could no sooner tell you how many bottles my Mom typically gave me in a day! I do recall piecing together little stories about dogs, using clippings from various magazines I had laying about. I was young enough . . . the most I learned from that experience was probably not to eat glue.

 

Q. What’s your favorite thing about writing for the Middle Grade age group?

  • I feel like MG readers still have enough youthful innocence that their imaginations are malleable, and willing to stretch a bit further than those of older readers.

 

Q. E.L. Doctorow once said, “Writing is an exploration. You start from nothing and learn as you go.” What have you learned from the past few books you’ve worked on?

  • I’ve learned that there are no shortcuts in the writing world. I think everyone wants to be this overnight sensation. They imagine the Hollywood version of a writer–where a book deal is lain your lap by some publisher heralding your praises. If you believe that, I’ve got some magic beans to sell you! This is W-O-R-K…a mountain of it. So much, in fact, that no sane person would ever seek it out.

 

Q. If there was one fairy tale you’d like to rewrite for a modern audience, which one would it be, and how would you write it?

  • I guess the idea of rewriting turns my stomach a bit. It makes me ill to see things copied over and over and over and over again. There are so many amazing, creative new ideas. Why do we keep rehashing the old ones? Naw, my mind wants to create something new. I have far too much imagination to mimic someone else.

 

Q. Everyone always goes on about what they love about writing. What do you dislike about writing, and how do you overcome this?

  • I’ve come across it a few different times and can’t tell you who the original author was/is….but the quote that comes to mind is, “I hate writing. I love having written.” That’s me, in a nutshell. It’s always difficult to get myself to just SIT DOWN AND WRITE. But when I do, I always walk away feeling immensely satisfied. There’s nothing like it. Well, short of cake. 😉

(edit – Thank you to alamlovespoetry via twitter, for letting us know that Dorothy Parker is the source to this quote)

 

Q. Are there other art forms you find yourself taking part in?

  • I do a bit of sculpting, but the kiln keeps blowing my stuff to bits. I feel like someone is trying to give me a hint.

 

Q. Writing is an exhausting process, and it’s always good to take a step back before attacking the page again. What helps you the most when it comes to taking a break from writing?

  • I do a lot of walking. A LOT. 10 miles a day. It’s very therapeutic and meditative.

 

Q. Which character of yours do you find yourself thinking of more than others?

  • Curiously, I think about the animal characters. It’s so difficult to interpret what animals are thinking, because they can’t tell you. I always worry that I’m not portraying them correctly.

 

Q. Lastly, where do you see your writing career taking you in five years?

  • I’d love to say that I see myself skyrocketing to the top of the NYT Best Seller list, but if my past 15 plus years are any indication . . . I’ll just be slogging along, as per usual . . . sharing my work and trying to bring a bit of magic into this oft-dull world.

 

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Want more of K Kibbee? Find her here! 

http://www.Goodreads.com/KKibbee
http://www.Facebook.com/KKibbeewrites
http://www.Amazon.com/author/KKibbee
http://www.Incorgnitobooks.com/authors/K-Kibbee
Twitter @K_Kibbee

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What’s in my bag?

Well I’m running late again today. I got caught up with conversations on Twitter, making a massive surprise project for my sister’s baby shower, and then got to talking plot with my writing partner.

But I’m here now, so welcome to day five of the January Blogging Challenge! 

I have a few handbags, but none are as important to me as one my husband picked up at a military surplus store. What used to be an old gas mask bag is now toting around my wallet, keys, pencils, pens, loose change, and almost always a book or two. It doesn’t look big, but it must have some TARDIS/Mary Poppins magic, cause I keep everything in here.

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Occasionally I’ll have a random curio tucked away in the bottom, like a worry stone, or a pendant to St. Christopher (my current odd thing out in my bag), and I almost always have one or two tubes of chap stick, even though I rarely use it.

It’s not expensive, and it looks ragged, but I love my bag. It’s sturdy and is probably the most “me” thing I own.

 

Want more January blogging challenges? Check out Tanja RamirezLily Couldridge, and Alexandra Burt‘s pages. They’re all taking part as well. It’s not too late for you to do the same! Just link me to whatever social media you’re posting your challenge on, and I’ll give you a shout out.

My Pen Name

Day two of my January blogging challenge!

When I was younger, and I mean way younger, we’re talking ten or eleven, I wanted my pen name to be Eleanor Wolfe. Wolves were my favorite animal, and Eleanor was the name my mom was going to give me. It made sense at the time. It was a clever name I could hide behind, and even entertained the idea of marrying a boy in my class with the last name Wolfe, although I never told him this.

Of course, I didn’t marry a boy just for his name at the age of eleven. And really, I didn’t have any opinions of him other than just liking his name, so it would’ve been a stupid reason to get married anyways.

After that, I became A.E.Wolverton. I swore off marriage until I got engaged my freshman year of college, to my best friend.

That brings us to today, where I’m known everywhere as A.E.McAuley. That being said, because I write both cheesy fun romance as well as dark scifi, I worry about how this will help or hinder my “author image”. I know that some of my work will only entertain a certain demographic, so while A.E.McAuley works for me, I might one day publish some of my work under a different pseudonym. Who knows? Maybe I’ll come back to Eleanor Wolfe after all.

 

Want more of this blogging challenge? Check out Tanja Ramirez, Lily Couldridge, and Alexandra Burt‘s pages. They’re both taking part as well. It’s not too late for you to do the same! Just link me to whatever social media you’re posting your challenge on, and I’ll give you a shout out.

January Challenge Day 1 – Introduction

It’s a new year, and to kick 2018 off right, I’ll be doing a blogging challenge.

31 Day Bloggin Challenge

I came up with each day’s topic based off things that interest me, or just topics I like to talk about, but today I’ll just be introducing myself and my writing.

Before I start, there are two other people taking part with me, fellow blogger Tanja Ramirez and a fanfiction writer “Lily“, but if you decide you’d like to take part, please let me know. I’ll give a shout out to you in the next day’s post!

As for me, I’m a twenty eight year old writer, who finished my first book, Flightless, last year. I live in Texas, but move around with the military quite a bit, and my interests outside of writing include everything from drawing, to baking, to diving into vanlife with my husband.

The next project I’ll be working on is a bit of a mystery to me right now, since I’ve been floundering a bit when it comes to starting my second book. I have a few ideas I hope to pin down, and since Flightless is laid out in a universe with plenty of stories to tell, I might tackle some short stories in that world.

I’m trying to keep myself open creatively, especially with how many changes I’ve been going through since November, but here’s hoping January is a productive start to the new year.

 

Check out Tanja’s day 1 here! 

Life Changes for 2018

I don’t like setting resolutions.

Maybe it’s the wording of it, just like I don’t like the word “diet”. Both seem so temporary to me. Sure, resolution means “a firm decision to do or not do something”, but how many people break these supposedly “firm decisions” within the first month of the new year? 

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Back in 2013, I started using the phrase “Life Changes” for the new year. Instead of saying I was going to do a diet, I said I was going to change the way I ate. Instead of saying I was going to exercise, I said I was going to make a change to how active I was in a day.

By focusing less on an end goal, I tweaked my day to day schedule and created solid habits. I wound up losing 20 pounds since then, and I finished writing a first draft of my book in a month, then edited it in another eight. Setting changes to my schedule helped me create long lasting results that I’m still benefiting from.

So here are ways I’m going to change my life in 2018.

~ I’m going to set aside one hour a day for reading, and one hour a day for writing. During those two hours, I can listen to music, however the tv must be off, and the phone needs to be on silent.

~ I plan on putting aside one day a week to focus on a new skill. It can be anything from learning a new crochet stitch, to finally learning how to parallel park (because I can finally admit that I have no idea how to do that). There is no pressure to master this skill (although learning how to parallel park would be nice), it’s simply to try a new thing.

~ I will dedicate two days a week to querying and learning more about the publishing world. I’ll talk with already published authors, take a class, or read more information that’s available, but I recognize that I need to change how I look at my road to publication.

~ Two days a month, I’ll attend a writing group meeting. If the other members of this writing group can’t show up, I’ll go someplace quiet and take that time to work on my next book.

~ I am going to travel one week next year to a place I’ve never been. It can be a different place every day, an hour away from my house, or it can be more than one day to somewhere I actually need to travel to.

~ I’m going to start going to bed later so I can wake up earlier to hit the gym for at least thirty minutes, every other day. While at the gym, I’m going to change how I work out, from taking it slow, to pushing myself a little harder every time I’m there. This also means I’ll need a gym membership, so I should probably get on that.

~ I will spend less time on my phone when I’m out in public by keeping my data off and making more of an effort in social situations.

~ I am going to change how I view social media by not putting such high standards on myself. This means posting only once a week on my blog, and scheduling other site posts instead of stressing over them.

~ And last, I will look for time in my schedule for volunteering with my community, either at the library, the children’s theater, or even stopping in at the blood donor center. I know I’ll have time, but I’ve never volunteered in the past because, let’s face it, I’m too focused on myself. By paying attention to when I’m being selfish, I hope to replace some of this time with giving back to others.

Flightless Fan Art #2 – Daniel Bennett

When I first made Daniel, he played a crucial part in the original draft of Flightless. 

In spite of this, there really wasn’t anything to him. He was his girlfriend, Elizabeth’s, arm candy, and my main character, Christopher’s little brother. Daniel filled any exposition holes, but he wasn’t really “his own man”. He only existed to benefit others not because he belonged in the story.

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Original artwork

 

So he was chopped from the final draft, but I realized I had a great opportunity to add him to a different book that exists in the same universe as Flightless.

I rewrote him, created a well rounded character, and wow, the art that came from the changes to him turned out incredible.

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Daniel & Elizabeth Commission by Maddy

Daniel grew up in an abusive household. While it wasn’t intentional abuse, his mother thought she was doing the right thing, it was abusive none the less. Unlike Christopher, who shouldered all the problems and saw it as his job to take the brunt of the pain, Daniel grew resentful.

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Anthony, Elizabeth and Daniel by Kennie

Even after he was taken out of the situation, he still acted like the world owed him something after everything he went through. When he was forced to move away from his brother, and in with an able bodied “flock” (a, yes, very cheesy word I use for my avian family units), he was crushed.

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Nap Time by Maddy

At the end of the first book, there’s talk of Daniel coming to see his brother again, after years of being apart, but when he arrives in the second, Christopher is already gone. Forced with another abandonment, he spends time with Elizabeth, and the two work through both of what’s happened in their past, while growing closer through mutual respect.

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Church Meeting by Jillian

I can’t wait to tell his and Elizabeth’s story. It’s going to have a heavier romance plot than my other ideas for the Flightless universe, but one that’s a slow burn compared to a whirlwind of emotions.

If you’d like to see more of my own Daniel art, here’s some below! Hope you enjoyed it.

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Want more artwork? Check out my last art share, for Anthony Ortega.

 

 

Obligatory Disclaimer

All above artwork was posted with permission given by the artists, so long as credit was linked back to above accounts. If you’d like to use any of the above artists, please contact them directly through links to ask before posting images. 

 

Who’s up for a January Blogging Challenge?

With 2018 fast approaching, and my creative moral low, I’m looking for ways to boost my spirits. Since I always loved topic challenges as a kid, I decided hey, if it got my butt in gear then, maybe it’ll help now?

Take a look, and if you feel like taking part, please do! Some of it is a little specific to me, so make any chances that you see fit.

31 Day Bloggin Challenge

Do you have a blogging challenge you’re doing? Share it below!

Aesthetic Sunday – “Flightless”

Hello all Aesthetic Sunday folks! Today I raided my Pinterest for everything related to Flightless and slammed them together for some aesthetic fun!

Enjoy! 

Kaitlin Harris
One of the two protagonists in Flightless, and definitely the most important, Kaitlin is an art history major who spends more time in libraries than she does in malls. After her sister’s kidnapped, she’s forced into a world she spent her whole life running from, and come to terms with not being entirely human. 

Christopher Bennet
My second protagonist, Christopher is a disabled winged character (avian), who’s trying to help Kaitlin better understand the avian world. While he too is more of an introverted character, he’s inspired by the way swans act in nature. Christopher knows he’ll never be able to fly, but he hopes he can still protect those who matter most.

 

 

Credit for pictures in the links on my pinterest. Should you see an image that belongs to you that you’d like removed from the post, please contact me and I’ll take it down immediately.

Flightless Fan Art – Anthony Ortega

Before I started writing Flightless, I was obsessed with drawing the characters in my winged universe.

Because I spent a lot of time developing the world through art, I wound up getting quite a few pieces of artwork over the years, either as fan art, or in some cases commissions. While I’ve always been active with artists of other mediums, I don’t spend a lot of time talking about Flightless with the writing community.

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Anthony by Kennie

So to open up more about the world I’ve been building, I’m going back to art. Over the next few weeks, I’ll be showing off some of the art I’ve received over the years, in hopes of letting people get to know my universe, as well as my characters. This week’s feature character is Anthony “Tony” Ortega.

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13 y.o. Tony by Sarah Weinberg

Tony, my little Spanish songbird from Cádiz, Spain, and is the youngest character in Flightless. In this universe, humans coexist around winged humanoids called avians. Besides having wings, they’re just like you and me…except for the fact that they have some questionable instincts and strict rules on what’s appropriate and inappropriate behavior.

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I’ll Fly Away by Megan

Tony’s mother is an avian, and his father’s human, so sadly, his wings will never develop for him to fly. In fact they’re significantly smaller than other avian’s his age. His mother was supposed to have gotten rid of him at birth, because it’d be kinder to him in their culture in the long run, but instead, she gives him to an avian who lost his wings, William.

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Getting Ready by Allicyn

While he has his own story I hope to tell one day, he’s a representation of the childish hope my main character, Kaitlin, has in being able to have a happy ending. He’s a sweetie so I hope to do him some justice one day, and at the very least give him a short story of his own.

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Anthony Commission by MurphAinmire

Here’s some of my own artwork for him. Hope you enjoyed!

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7 Ways to Write an Introverted Protagonist

Thanks to a poll on Twitter, this week’s Writing Wednesday is going to be all about writing the introverted protagonist (MC).

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I’m not a psychologist, and I know the science behind this post isn’t exact. These are just my observations when it comes to writing an introverted main character. It’s not the “right” or only way, but it’s worked for me.

It’s important to first point out being introverted doesn’t always mean being shy or antisocial. While yes, some introverts have both these traits, this isn’t a be all end all way to describe them. Instead, the way I like to say they get energy from being alone vs. being around others.

Better yet, here’s what vocabulary.com had to say about introverts.

Introvert comes from Latin intro-, “inward,” and vertere, “turning.” It describes a person who tends to turn inward mentally. Introverts sometimes avoid large groups of people, feeling more energized by time alone.”

So how do you apply this to a character without making them come off as cold, distant, or friendless?

1. Master the art of internal conversation.
Because introverts are more likely to rely on personal experiences to make decisions, writers creating an introvert should learn how to write believable internal monologues. This shows the MC doesn’t voice their need for the opinions of others, but works through what they know to solve a problem. It’s easier said than done. You have to find a balance between the MC working out ideas, and talking to themselves way too much. If you need a place to start, however, look at times in your manuscript when your MC relies too heavily on the input of others, and instead let them look inward on how they’ve solved problems in the past.

2. Have other characters be understanding when your MC excuses themselves from the group.
One of my least favorite friend character trope in movies or books is the “Why don’t you get out more?” friend. This is the side character who’s only purpose is to encourage your MC to declare their feelings to the love interest, or punch their boss in the face, or something equally as outlandish to an introvert. They’re constantly trying to fix their friend, but in real life, when an introvert is friends with this type of person, it often times has a toxic effect. They’re not friends, the introvert is a project for the extrovert, instead of an equal.

Instead, have some of your side characters not see the MC as a pet, but as a human being who has different interests. This not only provides a healthy relationship between the two, but it shows the readers that your introvert is comfortable being alone and also having friends who understand them.

3. Avoid “longing looks” into crowds.
Most introverts will tell you they don’t want to be extroverts. I’ve never met an introverted person who went home and cried about how upset they were because they didn’t enjoy an overly populated outing. I’m sure they’re out there, I just haven’t found them yet. It would be better to have your MC celebrate their introversion. Show them relaxed and grateful when they get away from a situation they find draining. Maybe even have them be a little prideful about the fact that they like being alone. Hell, I know that’s how I get sometimes.

4. Write an introvert who takes charge.
Introverts can in fact be in charge, and some people even claim they’re better suited for the role than extroverts. That being said, leadership isn’t just being the boss, it’s guiding your team to success. Just because they prefer a small get together verses a huge party doesn’t mean they can’t also step up and take their coworkers, friends, and/or love interests on a wild ride to solve your novel’s crisis. Let your introvert lead, instead of being too timid to do so.

5. Learn more about the Myers Briggs introverts.
This shows the varying degrees of introverts. Some, like the INTJ are distant and often times come off as too calculating to befriend, while others like the INFP are eager to let their strong moral compass guide them in making decisions. You don’t have to base every character you have off this system, but it’s a good place to start to see the differences between introverts.

6. Show don’t tell. 
I know people have mixed opinions on this, but hear me out. If you only say “my character is an introvert”, or “they don’t like social situations”, but your character never actually acts on these things, it doesn’t make your character an introvert. Instead of saying, “She didn’t like people, but was forced to be around them everyday for work.” you could just show your audience how much she hates being surrounded by customers, or how she finds sanctuary in her home after a long busy day. That way, it’s not just talk, there’s some action there, too.

7. Show the downsides to being an introvert.
I know I started this by saying, “Don’t just make them shy or antisocial”, but the reason why this is often times the only way people write introverts is because people perceive them this way. Being uncomfortable in a crowded place, getting worn out with too much interaction, and getting stressed when they don’t get some alone time are all some downsides for your character to experience.

Here are some other negative sides to introverted characters
– They can get so caught up in their thoughts that they overthink situations and cause more problems than they originally had.
– Because it takes time for them to make friends, when they make one, they could put that friend on a pedestal, giving the side character a place to fall from.
– They’re misunderstood by others because they turn down people’s offers to hangout, which can lead to comical misunderstandings.
– Being shy, or “afraid of social judgement” as Susan Cain puts it at TED2012, but only because they never learned how to navigate in social situations, as opposed to just being afraid of people.
– Some introverts aren’t risk takers, because they judge experiences based off of past events. If they took a risk in the past, and it turned out poorly, they might be more hesitant in the future.

 

I’ll do another blog post later about my favorite introverted protagonists as part of my “Favorite Trope” series. I go over some that fall into common character archetypes and how you can use those types in your own writing. 

For now I hope this helps! If you have any tips please feel free to share them below.