Tag Archives: am writing

Write Club DFW Submissions Open!

Hey all! I’ve been super busy lately, but I wanted to let y’all know there’s a new writing contest going on where you can win a chance to attend the 2020 DFW Writing Conference.

Write Club Soap 2

“Here’s the ABC’s of how it works. When the submission period opens (Mar 18-Apr 14), you simply send in a 500-word writing sample using a pen name (details on how to do that below). Once the submission period closes, all the entries are read by a panel of twenty volunteers (I call them my slushpile readers). The slushpile readers are a diverse group of avid readers and they each will select their top samples. Their selections narrow down the contestant pool to the thirty writers picked by the most judges. Over the course of the next eight weeks, we’ll hold daily bouts (M-F) right here on this blog – randomly pitting the anonymous 500-word writing samples against each other. The winners of these bouts advance into elimination rounds, and then playoffs, quarter-finals, and then ultimately a face-off between two finalists to determine a single champion. The writing sample can be any genre, any style (even poetry), from a larger piece of work or flash fiction — the word count being the only restriction. It’s a way to get your writing in front of a lot of readers, receive a ton of feedback, all without having to suffer the agony and embarrassment of exposure. How cool is that?

~ D.L. Hammons

Check out DL Hammons’ site for more information!

 

 

 

 

Advertisements

Writing Warm Up – Favorite Descriptive Word

Warm up – Pick one of your favorite descriptive word, describe how it sounds when you say it, and provide examples of how it’s used.

 

Frayed

((Warning: this post contains adult subject matter that might not be suitable for all audiences. Reader discretion is advised))

frayed-knot-1151828

Frayed. Say it slowly, and you can savor every part. The a rests on your tongue, starting at the back of your throat and coming to a halt in the middle of your mouth. The ending of the word, the ed, shreds the a into ribbons. Say it fast and it sounds like a child trying to pronounce afraid after they misplaced the first letter of the word.

It’s a bikini top worn by a woman who was only a girl a few years before, bright blue against her tan skin as she proudly struts her new body across a beach, each strand bouncing with the sway of her breasts. It’s harsh and ugly in the form of a rope cut by the hands of a father as he pulls the rough material from his son’s purple neck and tosses it from the boy’s body. It’s beautiful and nostalgic, like a hole in the pair of well loved jeans, or the grass after being cut on a summer day that entices a happy dog to roll about. It’s loving, like the corners of your favorite book that’s been read and reread so many times, the paper is starting to pull apart.

Sometimes you can’t touch it. It becomes a broken heart after a lover leaves. A patient’s hope can unravel as the ends of their hair split and crack before falling out completely. Rage can strain against the ropes of patience till they almost snap under the pressure.

Frayed.

You can see it, you can feel it, and if you say it slowly, and you can savor every part of it.

Godless and Writing Opening Scenes

Godless is a limited series released by Netflix in 2017. It didn’t gather the popularity of other “originals”, such as Stranger Things and Orange is the New Black, and when all is said in done, it’s not a particularly ground breaking show. I liked it fine, but it’s not the first thing that pops into my mind when someone asks for something to binge watch over the weekend.

So why can’t I stop thinking about it’s opening scene?

godless
If you haven’t seen it, go watch it. If you don’t have time to watch it, here’s a brief run down of what happens. But really. Go watch it.

Continue reading Godless and Writing Opening Scenes

Small Touches – Guest Author Daniel Link

I met Daniel at the DFWcon mixer, and hit it off right away. I had the pleasure of listening to him do a reading during a read and critique and was blown away so I knew I had to introduce myself to him. A month later, I’m still in touch and am very pleased to have him featured on my blog. Enjoy!

people-at-work-1459248-1280x960


 

Small Touches

by Daniel Link

 

DFWCon was not my first conference, so I thought I knew what to expect.

There were some pleasant surprises, things I hadn’t seen before. For instance, the sign-up slots for the Read and Critique, or Fix My Manuscript. Then there’s the ten-minute agent sit downs. The laid-back Texas vibe made talking to people easy, and that was most evident at Saturday night’s gala, which may have been the biggest surprise of them all.

First, the special sign-up opportunities. Fix My Problem was great, but my favorite was the Read and Critique. Those were fantastic, and I hate to say, underattended. I sat in on a Read and Critique Sunday with only five people there to read their work.

I get it, we’re introverts. We don’t like people all that much, and the idea of reading to them is terrifying. What we do love, however, is words. You have a chance to read your words to other people. How many chances to do that do we get? To walk into that room and see it empty, with two hundred and however many authors outside, some of them spending their whole conference in the lobby talking about getting to work on their book instead of doing it, that got to me.  If we won’t champion our own words, who will?

Sure, it’s important to touch base with people. It’s important to build that platform. It’s good to have a social media presence and a website and all that cart-before-the-horse nonsense.  Don’t get me wrong. When you’ve got your book in hand and you’re ready to promote it, when your baby is as polished as you can make it and it’s time to find an agent—that’s when it’s time to put on your business hat. Before that, though, there’s the all-too-important business of writing your best work. Don’t overlook that.

Another surprising aspect of DFWCon was the ten-minute sit down with an agent. I’ve attended conferences where the whole weekend is centered around pitch writing, pitch polishing, then group pitch practice, until you’re so pitched out you don’t even like the premise of your book anymore. The whole experience funnels you toward a fifty-minute speed dating session, three minutes to pitch an agent. It’s a whirlwind of shoving and flying elbows and an overall vibe of competition that I never felt at DFWCon.

The luxury of talking to an agent for ten minutes was a strange experience. I got to shake his hand and tell him my name, and I didn’t have to boil a year of my life into a ninety-second commercial or use cross-comps like Game of Thrones meets When Harry Met Sally, or Flashdance meets the Godfather. The downside, of course, was that I only got to talk with one agent. Then I got my biggest surprise—the gala.

The idea of the gala is nothing new. Another conference, one I will not name but takes place in a city in California by a bay, has a gala. Meet the agents and editors, the program said, so I put on my shiny shoes and got ready to mingle. It was in the bookstore downstairs, and the place was packed. A quick scan of the badges revealed that everyone in attendance was either a writer or a conference volunteer. The agents were all tucked into bed or out on the town laughing at everyone fooled into attending the gala. When I asked a volunteer where the agents and editors we were supposed to meet were, she disappeared in a puff of smoke like an 80’s movie ninja. When word spread that people were looking for the agents, the rest of the volunteers fled, leaving a hundred or so writers holding plastic cups of wine while tumbleweeds rolled through the bookstore.

The gala at DFWCon this year was the opposite. I arrived as it was starting, and the first person I ran into was Marisa Corvisiero. We talked for a few and she never used a smoke bomb to escape. Then I met Uwe Stender in the corner by the bar, where I talked with him for ten minutes or so. I moved on and mingled with other writers and geeked out properly for a while, then ran into Kevin O’Conner and Patty Carothers, both of whom I talked to at length. By the end of Saturday night I’d spent more time talking to agents than I had in two years at Unnamed City by the Bay Con combined. It was a great environment to try on that business hat—a pressure-free place to practice pitching and see what others think of your ideas.

As well as things went for me at DFWCon, I didn’t get everything right. I didn’t take enough pictures, didn’t post a single one to social media. I didn’t exchange numbers and business cards with all the wonderful people I met. The weekend got away from me, as it’s sure to do. If I’d been more on the ball, I’d have recorded my ten-minute sit-down with my agent. He gave me a lot of advice that I sort of remember. They wouldn’t let me take note paper in, but I did have my cell phone. We’ll try that again next year. And as for the people I didn’t connect with on social media, I hope they signed up, too.

My experience was a positive on a number of levels, enough so that I took advantage of the early enrollment for DFWCon 2019. The people were so pleasant and the price so reasonable that I couldn’t pass up the opportunity. Next year, I’m going to try to sit in on as many of the special classes that I can. These small touches are what set the conference apart.

There’s no better place to share your ideas, make contacts, and learn about trends in book marketing than writer’s conferences. Everyone should go to one. Then after you’ve been to one, been overwhelmed by the constant information and handshaking and notetaking, you need to do another one, then maybe one or two more for good measure. Do one of the Read and Critiques. No matter how scared you are, you’ll be glad you did. Then, once you’ve gotten over your fear of reading your words to strangers, you need to do it again. You’ll get better at it. Things will slow down. Until then, keep writing, keep championing your work, and getting it ready for next year.

 

 

Want to learn more about Daniel Link? Check out his website!

Write Club Update

Well submissions are closed.

Write Club Soap 2

I only got one in, mostly due to my own poor time management around the holidays, but I’m a little hopeful. Not entirely optimistic, but hopeful. Of course I’m still glad I did this. It’s already encouraged me to start submitting my writing to smaller contests, and I’ve gotten back into actively writing, as opposed to passively jotting down a few lines every day.

I can’t say that this year had a good start for me, creative wise. If I’m being more accurate, it really hasn’t been great since my move back at the end of October. But looking at my personal timeline, I will say every time I change states, I always get thrown out of sorts for three to six months. With this being the beginning of April, I’m right at that cut off, and can already tell my stamina is back up to create again.

I guess that’s one bad thing about constantly having to move no one really warns you about. Sure, you get to see new places, meet new people, and have different experiences, but at the end of the day, I’m still an introvert at heart. My personal time and space is very important, and when I have to uproot what feels comfortable, it’s hard to get that back right away. This isn’t a complaint so much as an observation. I’m grateful to have the life I do, and I know I’m extremely lucky, but it still takes some time to get back to normal after a big change.

Write Club helped me a lot, however. I feel a little more confident, and the thrill I got from even participating in the contest this far lit a fire under me. Even if I don’t make it to the top 30, I’m still happy with the experience.

 

As you might’ve been able to tell, this was a little bit more of a conversational post than normal. I know it’s a tad bit rambling, but I felt more casual tonight. Thanks for sticking through for this long though! If you liked this style more, let me know. I’ll gladly do more updates like this if it’s preferred.

 

Hope you all are having a good start to April. Keep writing lovelies ❤

WRiTE FIGHT CLUB

Write Club Soap 2

One of my “life changes” for 2018 was to take more risks with my writing. For some reason, submitting to contests has always made me more nervous than submitting to agents. I’m sure there’s a reason why I feel this way, but I try not to over think it.

It wasn’t until I started looking for writing conferences did I find a contest that seemed perfect for my nervousness when it comes to submitting to smaller submission slush piles.

WRiTE CLUB. Thirty writers enter the final fight, one writer leaves. On a less cheesy note, anyone from any genre can enter, so I figured, why not take a crack at it?

Even if you can’t go to the writing conference, if you’re a writer looking for an anonymous contest with little to no risk to you, you should check it out.

 

Are you going to any conferences or jumping into any contests? Let me know below!

Sunday Aesthetic – Misery in Magic

Take Beauty and the Beast and add a bit of The Craft, with a dash of The Sopranos. Throw in a pinch of the His Dark Materials trilogy (and I mean a small pinch), and what do you get? Misery in Magic.

At least, I that’s the recipe I’m using.

My work in progress is coming along nicely, but I’m still in the plotting stages. To get a better idea of what I wanted, as far as the vibe of my novel went, I made an aesthetic to help me along.

Enjoy a small blurb from my first chapter below!

misery in magic

No one said a word as Isabelle stood. Her siblings stared as she walked to the oldest of the McKellen clan, her chin lifted to meet his cold grey eyes. The tattoos on his arms and neck all told stories of people he killed and demons he summoned. Could she ever love him? No, but she would still marry him if it meant peace between their families.

“I’ll do it,” she spoke more clearly than she thought she could. “I’ll take your hand.”

His family behind him murmured, but hers was silent. They didn’t care what happened. She was their sacrificial lamb, and her future husband before her was the wolf they were feeding her to.

“Did you kill my sister?” he asked, his voice so deep it vibrated down to her bones.

“No,” she answered, “but if I agree to the terms of the treaty, does it matter?”

“No. I guess it doesn’t.” He was emotionless as he stared into her, finally shaking his head. “I agree to take you as my wife.

Cole O’Bryne. Her new husband. The man she was sure who would kill her.

 

What do you think? Have any other modern magical books or movies to suggest? I’m definitely enjoying the direction this romance is going, but could always use some more inspiration!