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If you follow me anywhere, you know I love working with artists.

And in my experience, many of them love working with writers. My favorite game to play with them is

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The girls in the corner booth weren’t witches. Despite the tarot cards tossed across the table, thick makeup, and black clothing declaring “moon child” and “daughter of the witches you could not burn”, they were as human as they came. If they had even an ounce of magic in them, they would’ve felt the warlock watching them.

Colvus missed the good old days, back when magic was whispers in the dark and nothing but shadows, and coming from a magical bloodline actually meant something. Now, every normal human with a grandmother who claimed to be a witch in the 60’s was a self-proclaimed “hereditary witch”. But, oh no, they wouldn’t cause anyone harm, or use their magic for “evil”. They were good magic users.

It made him sick.

He gulped his black coffee to feel something other than anger, ignoring the burn down his throat as he watched the girls giggle over tarot cards spread across the table. It was a disgrace. If they did that when he was their age, they would’ve been burned alive. Their whole families would’ve! Nowadays, they could act however they wanted with their pretty pewter pentacles and fake crystal rings. It was a free country and the worse thing that would happen to them would be a couple of dirty looks.

“They really should be careful.” The voice of his familiar cut into his thoughts. “We should teach them a lesson.”

Colvus put his lips to the cup again, hiding his murmur. “Not right now.”

He almost forgot the spirit was there. It was an easy thing to do, the creature had been with him since he first touched magic over ninety years ago. The weight of him on his shoulders was almost nonexistent after carrying him for so long, even as uncomfortable as it was. Tiny talons dug into his shoulders as the salamander-like spirit leaned over to lick the rim of the cup still poised in the air.

“You’re no fun.”

Of course he was no fun. He was the voice of reason; the spirit was invisible and had no consequences.

The fake witches let out another shrill burst of giggles, each high pitch laugh a knife between his ears.

Disgusting, he thought with a grimace. They are laughing on the graves of great men and women, playing at witchcraft without knowing anything about the power they were trying to tap into.

Colvus hoped they got burned by it.

“More coffee sir?” the waitress asked, distracting him from the scene in the corner.

She was the reason he was here, with her crooked smile and always on her toes to fill a half empty cup. He owed her a favor, even if she didn’t know it.

“Please,” he smiled, holding his mug out to her. “You’re always so good to me, Danielle.”

She gave a flirty smile, but it was lost on him. He was over a hundred and fifty years old. A twenty something wasn’t his type. Sure, he still looked like he was in his late thirties, but that didn’t get rid of the fact that he needed someone a little more grown up.

“Only because you’re my favorite customer.” She winked as she went back behind the counter.

“Her?” The spirit in Colvus’ ear scoffed. Colvus tried to wave him away like he was shooing a fly. “Don’t ignore me! Why her?

“She’s the last descendant of Torvald.” He murmured, looking down at his book. “If I’m ever to pay his bloodline back, it’ll be through her.”

“She’s not even touched by magic,” he snorted. The great red salamander crawled down his arm and curled up on the table to watch the human behind the counter. “Are you sure she’s Torvald’s bloodline? He was more powerful than you at one point. I expected better from his blood. ”

Colvus gave him a cold glare, turning the page of his book, but not responding.

The spirit smiled with green eyes the same color as the warlock he shared his bond with, his thick forked tongue coming out and flicking at him. “Fine. I will give her a gift. But you will pay for it later.”

As if he didn’t know that already. That was the rule of his spirit. Favors were repaid with favors, even if they were done for other people.

Colvus watched the spirit slid down the table with the ease of the amphibious creature he resembled and moved with an un characteristic speed for his thick tube body up to the counter. It always impressed him when the spirit worked. In all his years, he didn’t understand how demons pulled the strings of the world they lived in, no matter how many books he read or mentors he found.

Not that there were very many books or mentors left these days.

Colvus frowned at that and took another sip of his coffee, watching the porous hands of his spirit weave red threads from thin air, one leading up around the girl’s throat, another heading out the door. With a tug, the girl coughed, more tiny threads coming out of the spirit’s hands now. He braided them carefully with the other silk-like strands in his free palm, the gossamer glowing brighter with every jerky movement. When he was finished, he gripped the thread going out the door, took a smoky breath, and pulled hard.

Whatever happened on the other end, Colvus couldn’t be certain, but he knew the spirit started something in motion. With another firm tug on the braided middle strands and a determined nod, the spirit slunk back to him, his gaze hungry as he eyed the giggling girls in the corner and curled back up on Colvus’s shoulder.

“Is it done?” Colvus asked him, turning another page.

“What do you think?”

He nodded and went back to his coffee, still aware of the spirit’s focus on the girls.

“Do you think you could take another apprentice again? It’s been so long.”

He didn’t respond, the request was one the spirit already knew the answer to. When Colvus stayed quiet, the spirit sighed out a puff of sulfur.

“Too bad. It’s been a long time since I’ve had a decent sized lunch.”

Colvus still didn’t speak. Maybe it was his old age, maybe it was the growing suspicion that he was the last one of his kind left, but he was tired of letting his spirit have his way with humans. What was the point anymore?

“Here it goes.” The spirit caught his attention again.

A man, maybe in his early twenties, walked in and went right to the girl behind the counter. Colvus couldn’t make out the conversation, but it was clear she was a giggling mess by the time she was writing something on the boy’s hand. Colvus looked at the spirit quizzically.

“You got her a boyfriend?” he asked, ignoring a glance from one of the patrons as he talked to what the human would see as an emptiness above his shoulder. “I meant get her a new job, not help get her laid.”

The spirit hissed a giggle with a smile. “You should’ve been more specific.

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Time to Drop the Title for my Anthology (And Tell You Why this Collection is Different)

More publication news!

I’m always bumping into writers. Conferences, writers groups, random people on the train scribbling out a first draft. (Anyone else notice that almost everyone is working on a book?)

My favorites are the fantasy writers. Rather than being competitive (my foray into the music world showed me that artists can be terrible to each other) the nerds who gather around to talk about our magic systems and dragon names just want to geek out. It’s like finding your tribe.

But there’s something bittersweet about meeting with these kindred spirits. Believe it or not, there are more fantasy authors at a local writing conference than you’ll find on the shelves at Barnes & Noble. There’s not enough room in the mainstream market for all of us, or even a tenth of us.

We’re not (that) bitter. We’re grown ups who know it’s a narrow field with almost no room to break…

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Get to Know Me

After seeing the always amazing Mercedes Prunty post this fun questionare, I decided to snag it from her and do it myself. I’m a sucker for this sort of thing, and they’re a relaxed way to get to know a blogger.

Feel free to take this and do it yourself!

1. Favourite smell – This is probably my weakest sense, but I love the smell of dusty attics, rain after a dry spell, wet forests, my husband’s cologne and of course, old books.

2. Last time you cried – Last night, while watching a rescued baby donkey video. I might not be a big cryer but donkies are so damn cute.

3. Favourite pizza – Supreme.

4. Favourite flower – Lavender.

5. Favourite animal – It’s too hard to pick one. Let’s say birds, donkies and snakes.

6. Did you go to college – Yep.

7. Untie your shoes when taking them off – Nope.

8. Roller Coaster – Love them.

9. Favourite ice cream – Mint Chocolate Chip or whatever has the most chocolate.

10. Shorts or Jeans – Jeans.

12. What are you listening to – Rain outside my window, but I’ve been obsessed with Tupperware Remix Party, Florence + the Machine, and as always Bastille.

13. Dancing on ice? – I…don’t even know what this is asking me.

14. Tattoos?– Nope. I love them, but never felt the pull to get one.

15. Hair colour? – Brownish blonde.

16. Eye Colour? – Brown.

17. Favourite food to eat? – As opposed to drink? Ha. No, I like salad with goat cheese, apples and pecans.

18.Favourite holiday? – Halloween.

21. Beer or Wine? – Neither if I can get away with it.

22. Night owl or morning? – Night Owl.

23 Favourite day of the week? – Wednesday. I don’t know why, but I’ve always loved it.

24. Do you have a nick name? – Andie or if you ask my uncles Andieroonie.

25. Favourite season? – Fall

26. Favourite place to get away? – A bookstore, anywhere outdoors, or anywhere I can be alone.

27. Missing someone? – My bestie/sister from another mister.

28. Dream vacation? – To take a stealth camper van cross country and visit as many national and state parks as possible.

30. Regrets? – That I didn’t learn how to stand up for myself sooner.

31. Would you Go back to school? – Maybe. I went back to a trades school, but I wouldn’t mind getting a degree in something art and/or writing related.

32. Ocean or lake? – Lake but really I love huge rivers.

33. Who do you think will do this? – Someone like me who’s procrastinating writing.

Holler at me if you do this!

Urban Fantasy Genre Guide

This is a great list for writers and readers a like! It’s no secret, if you’ve been following me for a while, that I love Patricia Briggs and almost everything she’s done for the urban fantasy genre, but these other authors have also contributed so much to the literary world.

If you’ve read some of these, drop me a line and tell me what you think!

wrapped up in books

We’ve started a new kind of book club at my library: a genre book club. Each month, staff selects a sample reading list for a genre, patrons sign up for a book from the list, and then staff facilitate a discussion where each participant can discuss the book they read and how it relates to the genre as a whole. Ideally, everyone leaves with some books that piqued their interest, whether they were an avid reader of the genre or a total newbie.

Instead of having just one staff responsible for each meeting, the responsibility rotates and everyone is leading the discussion and compiling the genre guide book list for a genre they actually read and enjoy.

Even though I already lead a YA for grownups book club and my teens’ top ten book club, I couldn’t resist when I was asked to partner with staff from readers’ services to do…

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What I learned – January Goal Update

January is over, and I must say I feel like I kicked off 2018 with a bang.

I’m hoping I continue this into February, a month that’s always given me a hard time over the years, but before I jump forward, it’s time to look back.

GOALS ACCOMPLISHED

  • Try at least one new thing a week. 
    • I’m pretty excited about this one! This month, I learned how to use a sewing machine, finished crocheting an afghan, baked a cake from scratch, learned how to find my way from my small town to San Antonio, Texas, and started gardening. I learned way more than I thought I would, and it’s been an amazing experience.
  • Start a writer’s Group.
    • This one was technically accomplished, even if group attendance has an abysmal. The next meeting will take place on Saturday, so I’m crossing my fingers that people show up!
  • Host a giveaway. 
    • This one wraps up today, and I hosted it over on Twitter. There’s still some time if you’d like to jump on board.

 

GOALS I FELL SHORT OF

  • Do a January writing challenge.
    • This kind of ties in with the next one, but when I’m working on a novel, I tend to ignore challenges. Because I started two big projects this month, doing a challenge didn’t seem as important as starting to write my next book. Not a great way to handle challenges, but I’m glad I got my next novel started.
  • Complete an Instagram or Twitter Challenge. 
    • I’m not sure why I’m having such a hard time with these. I really enjoy them, however I push them to the back burner whenever another project pops up.
  • Limit my social media time to an hour a day. 
    • My online life goes one of two ways. Stay on it all day every day, or avoid it completely for days. The first one isn’t good for me, and the second isn’t good for my writer’s platform. I need to be more consistent and focus on the quality of what I’m posting, not the quantity.
  • Write and read for one hour a day.
    • While I accomplished this about half of the month, I still didn’t consistently write and read every single day. I have faith that my February will be better though.

 

SURPRISE ACCOMPLISHMENTS

  • Sent more queries for “Flightless” and got a full manuscript request. 
    • After a handful of rejection letters in early December, I took a break for three weeks before I started submitting again. On my third email, I got a full manuscript request about an hour after I sent the query, and it really renewed my faith in my writing.
  • Found books to cover my “2018 Reading Challenge”
    • Reading challenges are completely different for me than online challenges. I started a writing list on Instagram, and my stack is piling up. I’m going to have a blast knocking out all these books.

 

Did you finish any goals? What were you happy to have finished, and what do you wish you had done better?

Is your author platform shareable???

What a great informational post about engaging with your audience. I definitely could stand to do more when it comes to the interacting with other authors and bloggers. Thanks for such an amazing post Mercedes!

Mercedes Prunty Author

Are you not getting much action or shares, are people ignoring you and not engaging in your posts? Maybe its time for a social media clean up…

  • So it’s time to look through your social media platforms and see if there is anything we need to clean up. Do your pages hold anything that some of your readers might find offensive? E.G. Political views, Religious posts, and even some personal posts might be seen as offensive, even if you don’t mean them to come across that way. Yes ‘you’ like everyone else has their opinions and it can sometimes make for a good debate on certain topics but its normally best to leave them to you personal pages that your readership, fans and maybe potential publishers and editors can’t see. You don’t want to tarnish your author platform before you’ve even got started on becoming a brand name. (Unless it…

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5 Books That Changed My Life 

With Flightless being sent out to agents, I’ve been spending a lot of time thinking about books I’ve read that influenced my life as a writer. There are almost too many to pick from, but here are five that I still have on my bookshelf because of how they impacted me.

Most of the books on this list are from my childhood, or changed my life not because of what they said, but because of where I was when I was introduced to them. I believe that some books don’t have to have a powerful message, they just need to be in your life in the first place.


1. The Giver by Lois Lowry
This was the first book I read more than once. I was in sixth grade when I first got my hands on it, and Lowry’s writing captivated me in a way no other book had. Not because of the world or the characters, but the ideas. It made me think about who I was, and opened my eyes to themes in novels such as standing up for what was right and choosing the right path over the easy one. To this day, The Giver makes me want to not only write well, but to have my books mean more than just words on pages.

2. Full Tilt by Neal Shusterman
This book from my childhood, and its author if you’ve read my previous post about him, had a profound affect on my writing life. Full Tilt was the first book I read where the hero was reluctant to be one, and it showed me that not every protagonist needed to be excited by the aspect of being a hero. It shaped how I’d create my future characters.

3. The Alchemist by Paulo Coelho
I had to read this for a project in my high school English class, freshman year. I was a quiet high school kid with a fly under the radar type of attitude, but this book, like The Giver, taught me that I needed to chase after my dreams if I was ever going to achieve them.

 

4. Moon Called by Patricia Briggs
Back in 2008, as a quiet high school senior, I found a website dedicated to the Patricia Briggs series. I hadn’t read them, but the community was welcoming even to a newbie like me. I jumped on board and got to know fellow high school students obsessed with a world of vampires, werewolves, witches and then some.

It was here that I met someone who’s now a sister to me, who’s been my cheerleader when I’m down and an editor when I needed tough love. I want to meet, and sometimes surpass, her high standards and I hope to one day be half as creative and well spoken as her. If Patricia Briggs never wrote her Mercy Thompson series, I never would’ve found her, so I will always be grateful for her work.

5. Good Omens by Terry Pratchett and Neil Gaiman
This wasn’t the first book I read by Neil Gaiman, but it was the first time I was introduced to Terry Pratchett’s work, and wow, I was blown away. I read it only two years before his death, and when he passed away, I was crushed. Up to that point there was yet to be an author I enjoyed reading who died while I was only just getting introduced to their work and it reminded me to cherish the writers who are still alive.

 

Interviewing for Novel Information

If you have questions while writing your book, chances are the answers are online. For writers, the internet helps us create more believable worlds, shaped our characters to sound more realistic, and given us enough information to become textbook experts on a number of topics.

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That being said, one of the most important tools in a writer’s skill set is the face to face interview.

Over my years of writing, I’ve spoken with a number of people regarding my writings. From a woman who lived at a Hindu temple in Texas, to a Wiccan priestess, to even people who trim trees for a living; I’ve contacted a number of individuals to speak with to help me create my novels.

Here are some questions I get asked from my fellow writers as to how I go about my interview process.

 

How do you find the people to interview?

I’m a wanderer. I like to go for drives to see where I end up, and often times it’s in the most interesting places with interesting people. If I’m not lucky enough to find a place, however, I check with friends and family to see if they know of anyone who’s associated with the topic I’m needing information about. And last case scenario, I check online for people who come recommended in their field.

What type of questions do you ask?

Anything that could possibly pertain to your novel. From personal opinions, to politics of that lifestyle, to what it took to get them to where they are today.  Most people are willing to share it all.

What should I do if I don’t use the information?

There have been a few interviews where the information I gathered wound up not helping me for my novel at all. In most cases, I don’t do anything. I log the information away and see if I can use it in the future. I do, however, keep track of who I interviewed so I can credit them, should I ever use the information they’ve given me.

 

Anything else?

Be up front – Not everyone will want to be interviewed for a novel. If you’re not honest with them, and later on they find out you used things they’ve said in your book, that’s a bridge you could potentially burn for future questions.

Have your questions written out ahead of time – No one wants to spend 45 minutes of an interview fumbling through words, or trying to come up with questions. This is especially important for phone interviews as the interviewee can get bored very quickly, and lose interest in what you’re asking.

Be polite and professional – This should be a no brainer, but keep in mind that this person is taking time to talk about their personal life or work. They don’t want to feel like they’re wasting that time or you don’t know what you’re doing. Again, you don’t want to burn bridges with people you might need in the future.

Be aware of scams/Be safe – This is another thing that should go without saying, but don’t feel like you should have to pay your interviewee. If you’d like to take them out to coffee or lunch, that’s one thing, but if someone’s demanding payment or is asking you to follow them to a location where you don’t feel safe, don’t do it.

Be grateful – I would recommend putting a mention to your interviewees in the acknowledgement of your book. Even if you only use a little bit of information from them, it’s important to show gratitude as a courtesy.

 

Best of luck on your interviews!

Author Interview #6 – Claire Brown

Time travel, war, and a dog named Hero. Claire Brown’s social media caught my attention the instant I saw it, and since I’m a sucker for all three of those things, I spent hours panning through her pages. With three books under her belt, and more on the way, I hope to be able to do a book review for her work soon. For now, enjoy her interview, and keep an eye out for more from her in the future.

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Q.  As always, I like to do an introduction before we get to the writing questions. Tell us a little bit about yourself, outside of your writing life.

I don’t think I’m ever outside of my writing life!  I’m one of those writers where there is always a story in my head playing like a movie in the back of my mind.  

That aside, I’m an avid reader, movie goer, theater lover, baker and dog walker.

 

Q. I already mentioned this to you, but your dog, Hero, looks like such a sweetie. IMG_1598What are the joys that come when working with a close animal companion?

Thank you, Hero is as his name suggests a ‘hero’.  He’s a four year old Golden Retriever.  I’ve had Retrievers most of my life, Hero came in to my life when he was four weeks old and I was looking for a companion for my mam while I was at work.  We’d lost my dad the year before, while he was ill we couldn’t have pets but without him and without a dog there was just something missing.  From the moment we met Hero and he decided to chew my shoe we knew he was meant to be with us. 

HeroSo since the day we brought him home at 9 weeks he’s been a joy to be around.  Even as I write this he’s sitting beside me trying to close my laptop so I will take him for a walk.  He’s the kind of dog that makes you move, he never leaves your side and he makes you laugh everyday. 

He is the inspiration behind Captain in The Poppy Garden because he is in his own way a service dog to us.  He’s just a very naughty one!

 

JonahAxe_SMASHWORDSQ. Your Jonah Axe Series looks filled with action, adventure, and time travel. What inspired you to write this series, and how many books are you planning on writing for it?

Like most people there are times in life when something happens or you do something and wonder what if I’d done it differently, would things be better, worse or just the same?  I decided if there was a way to change things in life how would that work and how would it impact the lives of the people given that power to change things. 

I think the opportunities for the series are endless, I have drafted out a second novel which would look a little deeper in to the background of some of the main characters, after that I  have considered going back in time to the Tudor court, to Jack the Ripper and so on. 

 

 

Q. Being from Sunderland, England, what made you want to study American history?

I always had an obsession with America from childhood, I’m not quite sure where it came from.  When I applied for University and was talking to advisers about courses one recommended Joint Honours and since it gave me the opportunity to go to the USA and study there as well as in the UK I jumped at the chance.  I studied at Western Washington University for part of my second year and made some great friends.  

 

ThePoppyGarden_iPADQ. As a military spouse, I’m always grateful to writers who capture how war affects not only those who fight, but those they come home to. When writing The Poppy Garden, were you able to speak with multiple veterans, or was it inspired by solely your grandfather’s experiences?

I lost my grandfather when I was 16, and I always feel that the book of his life has so many blank pages. I tried for a long time to fill in those blanks but there is a lot of information on what happened to him that it’s just not possible to uncover. I couldn’t tell his story completely and that always frustrated me.

I was working in my garden one day trying to restore it from the manic digging of Hero when it dawned on me how much my grandfather relied on his garden and that it wasn’t just a hobby  for him.   When I started to think about it in a different way I found that there was another story I could tell. Initially I was able to speak to my grandfather’s brother who could tell me what happened once my grandfather got home. 

As part of my research I have spoken to a lot of ex-service personnel from forces and other uniformed services and I also managed to contact a member of my grandfather’s crew who told me what had happened to all members of the crew after WW2 and how they had coped or not as the case may be. 

I also looked to the women in my family who had coped with extremely stressful situations and how they were able to support their partners they became the inspiration for Sky. 

 

Q. Authors from all walks of life it seems has an opinion on one very controversial topic. Writer’s block. Do you believe in it, and if so, how do you get out of these slumps?

Oh yes I believe in it and I have had periods where I just haven’t been able to write.  I think for me it’s when real life outside of writing becomes too stressful or there is too much going on and your mind is just too tired.    I usually try not to beat myself up about it, I’ll try other things to relax be it go for a walk, go to the gym, read a book.  I think it’s about giving myself permission to have a break, not feel guilty about not writing and allow my mind and body to relax, then when I’m ready the ideas will start coming back. 

 

Q. Looking back on the past three novels you’ve written, what advice would you give to not only your younger self, but writers just starting to put out their books?

Write, just write anything and everything, don’t get hung up on the end goal whatever that is for you.  Write whatever your imagination inspires you to write.  Not every idea will become a book, maybe you’ll have an idea but you don’t really expand on it for a year or so, the main thing is you sit down, make time for writing to be part of your life because it makes you happy. 

When you have your framework or even finish your book, don’t be disheartened by those who criticize you, not everyone will love everything – it would be a rather boring world if that were so.  Pick your reviewers carefully, family and friends are great but if your friend is a horror fan giving them a romantic drama probably isn’t the best idea.   

At the end of the day as long as writing makes you happy that’s the most important thing. 

 

Q. With your extensive knowledge in history, what time period do you find yourself drawn to the most, and why?

I think it would have to be either Tudor England or WW2.  

When I was around six or seven I remember getting a magazine on Queen Elizabeth I and since then I’ve always loved the Tudor period.  I’m constantly watching documentaries about it and reading up on the dynasty from the War of the Roses through to the Gunpowder plot. 

Obviously my interest in WW2 stems from my grandfather, I used to spend my weekends with him and my Nan watching old movies, listening to Glenn Miller.  I also think my personal style suits 1930’s/1940’s dress – just as some people love the Boho look or goth look I tend to love that Old Hollywood style. 

I think everyone has some time or something that they harken back to as almost a golden age, looking at it through rose tinted glasses and that’s probably how I look at both these time periods.

 

Q. The editing process can be a long road if you don’t know where to start. When it comes to make adjustments to your first draft, what’s the first thing you look to improve on?

Initially once I’ve completed a work, I give myself around two weeks away from it so when I go back to it it’s with a fresh mind.  I then tend to work on grammar, layout and story edits as I go.   I think once I have it in almost the right format it’s easier for me to work through and spot the errors, omissions in the story.  I can then work on expanding where I need to or cutting out what’s no longer necessary. 

 

Q. From your blog, you say you have a love of baking. What would be your favorite pastry to make, and your favorite pastry to eat?

I’m love making a steak pie – I do have to be careful with some foods so I tend to make it how my nan taught me as a puff pastry top rather than a full pastry base.  There’s nothing better than having that golden crispy top to slice through and hear crack and crumble. 

On the sweet side at the moment I’ve been making a lot of Jam twists and spirals which are so simple to make and taste great.  Or there is a recipe I came across on Goodfood to make an almond biscuit which is like a cross between a meringue and a macaroon which are completely addictive. 

If I’m buying a pastry I’m a sucker for an almond croissant.  I love anything with almonds and/or marzipan. 

Q. What made you decide to do the independent route when it came time to publish your books, and how has it been the most rewarding?

I had tried from the age of nineteen to go down the traditional publishing route with a few projects including a screen play and radio play.  I took some time away from writing during my dad’s illness, after I lost him I decided life was too short to wait for someone to believe in me and if I wanted to be a published writer there were now ways and means that weren’t available when I was nineteen. 

It was a great moment for me to finally see my work in print – as a paper back and as an ebook, it did boost my spirits and help me in darker times to focus. 

 

Q. In Chapter 9 of your blog is all about the right visual for book covers, and I agree with you that Jeanie Henning’s work is eye catching and beautiful. While many authors don’t even get to speak with their cover artists, let alone have a say in what goes on said cover, what’s your favorite part about building your cover with a fellow artist?

I was really lucky to find Jeanie when I did, she’s a great artist where as my artistic talents are probably more like a two year old with colouring pencils.  I’m creative just not artistic!  Jeanie is great as she has a way of working that really works for me.  For my first two novels we work on a Q&A basis from which she draws out the major points of the novel and works on creating images to match that.  Once she has a draft we discuss it and make minor changes.

For The Poppy Garden, it was a slightly different process as I knew the visual I wanted – I put in to words what I was looking for provided some images and Jeanie expanded on that.  The first version we discussed and tweaked before we got to what is the cover now. 

I think for me its vital to get a cover I love as it represents me and my work so I have to really connect with it. 

 

Q. What genre do you love to read the most, and who’s your favorite author in said genre?

I can be pretty eclectic in all things, books, movies and films. 

I do love Agatha Christie, so when I want something familiar and reassuring that I know I’ll love I tend to go for a cozy mystery, I love the Agatha Raisin Series and recently I’ve been reading some of the British Library Crime Classics which are brilliant.

History wise I love reading Lucy Worsley, her book The Art of British Murder is a favorite.

Romantic Drama’s are great and I’ve really enjoyed books by Fiona Harper, Samantha Tongue, Holly Martin and Lisa Dickinson. 

I’m also a Christmas obsessive so any Christmas book is good for me.  I love classics like A Christmas Carol each year I have a stock of Christmas themed novels to read from the beginning of October. 

 

Q. Novel writing and blogging can be two completely different animals, but it looks like you’ve tamed them both. What’s the most enjoyable part of blogging that you’ve found to be different from writing novels?

I think for me blogging has become a bit like keeping a diary, while I’m not going to reveal any deep dark secrets it does help me clear my mind.  It’s like having a conversation with a friend over a cup of coffee and piece of cake. 

 

Q. Holidays play a big part in your blog. If you could spend Christmas with any author, alive or dead, who would it be and what would you get them?

It would have to be someone like Charles Dickens for Christmas – he created the imagery of Christmas for me, the snowy Victorian streets with the carol singers just make me feel all warm in side. 

I think as a present for him it would have to be a leather monogramed notebook and fountain pen – I’m not so sure he’d appreciate an ipad! 

 

Q. My favorite topic to talk about with other writers are when it comes to their antagonist. Even if it’s a “situational” antagonist, the relationship between the writer and their villain has always fascinated me. Which antagonist do you find yourself enjoy writing the most, and how do you relate to them?

For me as a child I was bullied severely from around 5 to 16, as anyone who has been bullied will probably tell you those experiences stay with you.  I think for me my villains take on the worst elements of the bullies, I’m not sure if I enjoy writing them or whether it’s just become a way of me addressing something that shaped my life. 

 

Q. You’re very organized when it comes to your creative process. What would you say is the best part about the way you work?

I think for me love the whole process of writing be it making notes in a not book because I’ve had a great idea in the most ridiculous of places, or walking with Hero and looking like a right idiot as I dictate ideas in to my phone. 

There’s nothing better for me than sitting by the fire with my laptop writing away it’s like dictating a movie that plays in my head only if I don’ like a scene I can quickly rewind and change it. 

 

Q. What novel would you say is under-appreciated that you’d suggest the audience to go out and read?

One of my all time favorites is Phantom of the Opera by Gaston Lerox, I think the musical outshines the book in peoples mind and while I love the musical the book to me is a darker exploration of what makes a complex monster and the social constructs of the time. 

 

Q. To end, tell us a little bit about what you’re working on right now and when you hope to have it finished.

Currently I’m working on an idea for a romance with a hint of fairy tale about it. 

 

IMG_0760Want to find out more about Claire Brown? Check out her websites and social media below.

Website:  http://clairebrownempire.wix.com/clairelbrownautho
Blog:http://clairelbrownauthor.blogspot.co.uk     & http://myifeasawriterwhennotscribbling.blogspot.co.uk

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ClaireLBrown.MyLifeAsAWriter/
Instagram: https://instagram.com/clbrown_author/
Twitter: @CLBrown_author
Amazon: http://amzn.to/1L86LHd
Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCRBjOrUZiRwUliIJ-I9hB7A
Pinterest: https://www.pinterest.com/clbrown34author/
Draft to Digital; https://www.books2read.com/u/bzp9qq