Top 10 Things Unpublished Writers Hear

The road to being a published author is a bumpy one. Holding down a day job, raising kids, constant criticism, and your own internal struggle can be daunting. You know one day you’ll get there, but in the mean time, here are things you’ll probably wind up hearing.

  1. “Why don’t you just self publish?” or alternately “Why don’t you just find an agent?”

Not every publishing style is perfect for every writer. What works for someone else might not work for you.

2. “Can you write me something for free? It’ll be good publicity.”

I’ve heard this a few times from people who want something like fan fiction or smut stories between them and a character/celebrity. It’s not really great publicity, when I’m not a romance writer.

3. “You’re a writer? But what do you REALLY do to earn money?”

I’ve heard this one more than once. I have a day job, but one day I’d like to be able to say that IS what I do to earn money.

4. “You’re a writer? So is my uncle! His agent just sold his 5th book to a publishing house!”

I’m always happy to hear someone being successful, but yeah, sometimes I do get a little envious.

5. “You’re just not trying hard enough!”

For many writers, this can be true, but when you just start submitting, you’re at the beginning of your journey. Keep submitting. You’re doing great.

6. “You could be the next Stephen King!”

Do you know how lofty that goal is? Hell, I just want to get a book out there, I can focus on becoming ridiculously popular and established later.

7. “When does your book come out?”

Good question. As soon as I get that agent and manage to sell my manuscript I’ll let you know.

8. “What does your spouse/family think?”

I’m not sure why this one comes up. It always makes me scratch my head and wonder why it matters? Even if I didn’t have support I’d still be trying to be a writer. Should their opinion really matter that much?

9. “Why not write a book about something that’s popular right now?”

Because trends are constantly changing and you shouldn’t cater to what’s popular. By the time you’re finished with your book, it’ll be out of style.

 

10. “You just finished your first book, what are you going to work on next?”

Image result for overwhelmed gif

First, I’m going to take a second to breathe, send out query letters, build a writer’s platform and sign up for some conferences….then maybe write something about human cloning, but you know, that’s a little ways away. The point is, there’s a lot that comes next.

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5 Books That Changed My Life 

With Flightless being sent out to agents, I’ve been spending a lot of time thinking about books I’ve read that influenced my life as a writer. There are almost too many to pick from, but here are five that I still have on my bookshelf because of how they impacted me.

Most of the books on this list are from my childhood, or changed my life not because of what they said, but because of where I was when I was introduced to them. I believe that some books don’t have to have a powerful message, they just need to be in your life in the first place.


1. The Giver by Lois Lowry
This was the first book I read more than once. I was in sixth grade when I first got my hands on it, and Lowry’s writing captivated me in a way no other book had. Not because of the world or the characters, but the ideas. It made me think about who I was, and opened my eyes to themes in novels such as standing up for what was right and choosing the right path over the easy one. To this day, The Giver makes me want to not only write well, but to have my books mean more than just words on pages.

2. Full Tilt by Neal Shusterman
This book from my childhood, and its author if you’ve read my previous post about him, had a profound affect on my writing life. Full Tilt was the first book I read where the hero was reluctant to be one, and it showed me that not every protagonist needed to be excited by the aspect of being a hero. It shaped how I’d create my future characters.

3. The Alchemist by Paulo Coelho
I had to read this for a project in my high school English class, freshman year. I was a quiet high school kid with a fly under the radar type of attitude, but this book, like The Giver, taught me that I needed to chase after my dreams if I was ever going to achieve them.

 

4. Moon Called by Patricia Briggs
Back in 2008, as a quiet high school senior, I found a website dedicated to the Patricia Briggs series. I hadn’t read them, but the community was welcoming even to a newbie like me. I jumped on board and got to know fellow high school students obsessed with a world of vampires, werewolves, witches and then some.

It was here that I met someone who’s now a sister to me, who’s been my cheerleader when I’m down and an editor when I needed tough love. I want to meet, and sometimes surpass, her high standards and I hope to one day be half as creative and well spoken as her. If Patricia Briggs never wrote her Mercy Thompson series, I never would’ve found her, so I will always be grateful for her work.

5. Good Omens by Terry Pratchett and Neil Gaiman
This wasn’t the first book I read by Neil Gaiman, but it was the first time I was introduced to Terry Pratchett’s work, and wow, I was blown away. I read it only two years before his death, and when he passed away, I was crushed. Up to that point there was yet to be an author I enjoyed reading who died while I was only just getting introduced to their work and it reminded me to cherish the writers who are still alive.